RHYTHM CIRCUS

INTERVIEW // BURY TOMORROW - DAVYD WINTER-BATES
Sitting backstage of the 02 Islington is Davyd Winter-Bates, bass player of UK metalcore band Bury Tomorrow. He is ready to be interviewed regardless of the very loud metalcore coming from the next room (which happens to be the stage) being performed by Heart In Hand. Seemingly unaffected by this, he is ready to answer some questions about his band’s UK tour that is about to come to an end, and what he has in store for the foreseeable future. Overall, he emits a friendliness and down-to-earth quality, as if none of this is a big deal; he is one of the most genuine people anyone could ever wish to meet and it is refreshing to meet somebody with absolutely no sense of egotism or self-entitlement – instead just a gratitude to be able to do a job he is so passionate about.
How have you felt the tour has gone so far, has there been any particular night you have really enjoyed? It’s really like our first headliner in a pretty long time, so it’s been a pretty amazing experience to play all the venues. So, I can’t really pick one out because they’ve been all so incredible. Yeah, it’s just really, really been an amazing time.
How do you think the material from The Union Of Crowns has been received on this leg of the tour? It’s definitely the most popular! I guess that’s where most people have heard of us from, the stuff most people have been involved with. I mean, yeah, you can’t ask for more really. When we do play the Portraits stuff it’s a bit more like only the real fans know that, and I like that.
Is there any particular track which you think has gone down really well? Sceptres has gone down really well on this tour, but obviously the big ones like Lionheart and Royal Blood, they’ve all been going down pretty well.
When picking the setlist, how hard have you found integrating tracks from Portraits with tracks from The Union Of Crowns? Is there anything you wish you could have put in that didn’t make it into the final setlist? We’ve basically tried to make what we’d consider a ‘greatest hits’ of the two albums. We knew we had twelve songs to play, so we thought let’s try and put in our favourite twelve to play live in a set, and that’s what we did. I mean, yeah, there’s always other songs I wanna put in there, but there’s always next time and the next step, which will be awesome!
So in terms of support acts, you’ve got Heart In Hand, Empress and Feed The Rhino on this leg of the tour, any particular reason you wanted to bring these guys out for the UK shows? Yeah, they’re all the best bands in the country at what they do right now! Feed The Rhino are leading the way with that hardcore southern style, Empress are one of the best progressive bands to come out of the UK in a very long time and Heart In Hand have been absolutely smashing it out on the road. We wanted the best and we got them!
When you step out on stage, what’s the one thing you want to see from a crowd immediately? Circle pits! Straight away, before I’ve even played a single note I wanna see circle pits!
You’ve played a lot of festival shows this year, do you prefer playing more intimate shows, like on this tour, or do you prefer stepping out to the huge festival crowds? How do you think your festival shows went down this year in comparison to previous years? They’re very different, and I like both. My favourite shows in the world are floor shows, where there’s no barrier and you’re on the same level as other people, but the experience I’ve had this summer has just been unbelievable, so it’s been a real nice mix of things. I think we’ve had the best festival season we possibly could! I mean, there isn’t really a festival that people were like ‘oh well you didn’t play that one though.’ I don’t think there’s a single festival this summer where I’d have thought it would have been great to have gotten to play that. It’s been amazing for us, best summer of our lives.
You’ve played support sets for a lot of amazing bands, are there any bands you love touring with? Are there any bands you’d love to tour with in the future? I love touring with the Architects guys, they were wicked, and I mean I’d love to tour with Slipknot, straight-up I’d love to open with Slipknot! That’d be amazing!
Is there anything in particular you guys get up to when you go out on tour? When we go out on tour we always just try and enjoy it. I mean, it is a job, and it is hard, and when you’re away from home, but we try and enjoy it, like, we’re here and we’re not gonna get to do this forever; so our tour ritual is to go out and make sure we have a smile on our faces when we step out on stage, and that’s what I want to achieve every day.
So, when the tour’s finished it’s been rumoured you’ll be going into the studio to record the next album, how’s that all going? Yep, the album’s written, we’ll be heading straight into the studio after this tour, we’re just gonna record it and get it out for people as soon as possible!
When you go out on tour, is there any place you make sure you get to play? Just the UK, in general, like, everyone here is brilliant, they’ve supported us for years. It’s always nice going outside of the country and people knowing who you are, but honest to God, doing this tour has proved to me how great it has been.
So, if tonight is anyone’s first Bury Tomorrow show, what can they expect from it? Are there any surprises in store? Yeah, lots of circle pits! Like, as I’ve said before, we love circle pits! We just wanna be ‘that’ band that, when we were growing up, which made you wanna go and see newer bands, so if we can be someone’s gate-way metal band, then that’s all we wanna do!
Words > Stephen Morris

INTERVIEW // BURY TOMORROW - DAVYD WINTER-BATES

Sitting backstage of the 02 Islington is Davyd Winter-Bates, bass player of UK metalcore band Bury Tomorrow. He is ready to be interviewed regardless of the very loud metalcore coming from the next room (which happens to be the stage) being performed by Heart In Hand. Seemingly unaffected by this, he is ready to answer some questions about his band’s UK tour that is about to come to an end, and what he has in store for the foreseeable future. Overall, he emits a friendliness and down-to-earth quality, as if none of this is a big deal; he is one of the most genuine people anyone could ever wish to meet and it is refreshing to meet somebody with absolutely no sense of egotism or self-entitlement – instead just a gratitude to be able to do a job he is so passionate about.

How have you felt the tour has gone so far, has there been any particular night you have really enjoyed? It’s really like our first headliner in a pretty long time, so it’s been a pretty amazing experience to play all the venues. So, I can’t really pick one out because they’ve been all so incredible. Yeah, it’s just really, really been an amazing time.

How do you think the material from The Union Of Crowns has been received on this leg of the tour? It’s definitely the most popular! I guess that’s where most people have heard of us from, the stuff most people have been involved with. I mean, yeah, you can’t ask for more really. When we do play the Portraits stuff it’s a bit more like only the real fans know that, and I like that.

Is there any particular track which you think has gone down really well? Sceptres has gone down really well on this tour, but obviously the big ones like Lionheart and Royal Blood, they’ve all been going down pretty well.

When picking the setlist, how hard have you found integrating tracks from Portraits with tracks from The Union Of Crowns? Is there anything you wish you could have put in that didn’t make it into the final setlist? We’ve basically tried to make what we’d consider a ‘greatest hits’ of the two albums. We knew we had twelve songs to play, so we thought let’s try and put in our favourite twelve to play live in a set, and that’s what we did. I mean, yeah, there’s always other songs I wanna put in there, but there’s always next time and the next step, which will be awesome!

So in terms of support acts, you’ve got Heart In Hand, Empress and Feed The Rhino on this leg of the tour, any particular reason you wanted to bring these guys out for the UK shows? Yeah, they’re all the best bands in the country at what they do right now! Feed The Rhino are leading the way with that hardcore southern style, Empress are one of the best progressive bands to come out of the UK in a very long time and Heart In Hand have been absolutely smashing it out on the road. We wanted the best and we got them!

When you step out on stage, what’s the one thing you want to see from a crowd immediately? Circle pits! Straight away, before I’ve even played a single note I wanna see circle pits!

You’ve played a lot of festival shows this year, do you prefer playing more intimate shows, like on this tour, or do you prefer stepping out to the huge festival crowds? How do you think your festival shows went down this year in comparison to previous years? They’re very different, and I like both. My favourite shows in the world are floor shows, where there’s no barrier and you’re on the same level as other people, but the experience I’ve had this summer has just been unbelievable, so it’s been a real nice mix of things. I think we’ve had the best festival season we possibly could! I mean, there isn’t really a festival that people were like ‘oh well you didn’t play that one though.’ I don’t think there’s a single festival this summer where I’d have thought it would have been great to have gotten to play that. It’s been amazing for us, best summer of our lives.

You’ve played support sets for a lot of amazing bands, are there any bands you love touring with? Are there any bands you’d love to tour with in the future? I love touring with the Architects guys, they were wicked, and I mean I’d love to tour with Slipknot, straight-up I’d love to open with Slipknot! That’d be amazing!

Is there anything in particular you guys get up to when you go out on tour? When we go out on tour we always just try and enjoy it. I mean, it is a job, and it is hard, and when you’re away from home, but we try and enjoy it, like, we’re here and we’re not gonna get to do this forever; so our tour ritual is to go out and make sure we have a smile on our faces when we step out on stage, and that’s what I want to achieve every day.

So, when the tour’s finished it’s been rumoured you’ll be going into the studio to record the next album, how’s that all going? Yep, the album’s written, we’ll be heading straight into the studio after this tour, we’re just gonna record it and get it out for people as soon as possible!

When you go out on tour, is there any place you make sure you get to play? Just the UK, in general, like, everyone here is brilliant, they’ve supported us for years. It’s always nice going outside of the country and people knowing who you are, but honest to God, doing this tour has proved to me how great it has been.

So, if tonight is anyone’s first Bury Tomorrow show, what can they expect from it? Are there any surprises in store? Yeah, lots of circle pits! Like, as I’ve said before, we love circle pits! We just wanna be ‘that’ band that, when we were growing up, which made you wanna go and see newer bands, so if we can be someone’s gate-way metal band, then that’s all we wanna do!

Words > Stephen Morris


SCROOBIUS PIP // INTERVIEW

Scroobius PipScroobius Pip – the bearded face of the UK’s spoken word scene – is hosting a monthly film night at London’s coolest indie picture-house, The Prince Charles Cinema. Kicking off with Spanish time-travel thriller Time Crimes (click here for tickets), Pip’s mission is to take his London fans on a journey through his cinematic tastes and Rhythm Circus is along for the ride.

Naturally we wanted to know more and Pip, ever the gracious gent, agreed to answer a fistful of our geekiest questions…

The first question has to be about facial hair I’m afraid. Who has the most outstanding beard in cinema? 
Me when I finally make my transition over to film! For now I’d have to give the long term crown to Brian Blessed. Never has a beard looked so good.

Tell us the story behind your night at the Prince Charles? 
Well, I have been a fan of the place for years and, to be honest, I think they got sick of me arguing with them on Twitter about what they should and shouldn’t screen. So they agreed to give me my own monthly night where I can introduce a film of my choice and then host a Q&A or panel of some sort afterwards. I cant wait!

Time CrimesWe hear you are kicking off the series with Nacho Vigalondo’s mindbending Timecrimes, an under-seen Spanish indie rather than an established cult flick. Interesting choice…
Well, when I saw Harvey at the Prince Charles it struck me how amazing it was to see, on the big screen, one of my favourite films that I had only ever watched at home. So when choosing my films for this run I wanted to pick stuff that a) I loved, and b) many people either wont have seen OR simply wont have seen on the big screen.
Timecrimes seems to me to be one of the great overlooked films. Partly, I feel, to the tone of it being completely lost when the title is translated into English! Lets face it, Timecrimes sounds like an Arnie or Van Damme film.
I am currently working on getting a video introduction from Nacho himself and will have a panel afterwards where a physicist will discuss theories of time travel and I, along with film nerd and comedian Rich Sandling, will discuss the subjects of good films with bad names and the general horror of what can be lost in translation.

Let’s talk mainstream: what’s been your favourite cinema going experience of the summer?
Tough question! I LOVE the cinema and try to go four or five times a month. I think Alpha Papa has to take it though. Such a huge Alan Partridge fan, and I was worried about how they would pull it all off, but I absolutely loved it.

As a man with a penchant for the spoken word, you must be particularly attuned to dialogue when you’re watching a film. Do you have a favourite line?
It would either be Elwood P Dowd’s speech towards the end of Harvey (ending with) “….for years I was smart… I recommend pleasant” or Lloyd Dobler in Say Anything “I gave her my heart…she gave me a pen…”

We loved the video to Stunner (see below), your new track with dan le sac. It seemed like the video might have been influenced by the films of Gaspar Noe (Irreversible, Enter the Void). Was this intentional? 
It wasn’t intentional but I do produce and direct my own videos and I’m a MASSIVE fan of Gaspar so it’s lovely to hear that has some how come through. Irreversible is hopefully going to be the third film in my run of monthly nights at the Prince Charles. I remember seeing that on its initial short cinema release and being overwhelmed by the experience.
Similarly when Gaspar came over to do a Q&A and screening of Enter the Void. I think Enter the Void was the first film I saw that made me gutted I couldn’t watch it immediately again on DVD. Some of the shots instantly jumped out as having a hugely different impact on DVD compared to on the big screen. Neither better or worse, but it was something I wanted to check straight away!

Finally, if Scroobius Pip and dan le sac had a Lightsaber duel, who would win?
I am gangley and rangy so I therefore think I would have a slight advantage.

Be sure not to miss Scroobius Pip Presents… Timecrimes at the Prince Charles Cinema this Thursday. We’ll see you there.

For more info, and tickets, visit: PRINCE CHARLES CINEMA

Words > Andy Wilson


THE 1975 // ALBUM REVIEW

The1975The length of time spent working towards a debut album release will vary considerably between artists, and this can impact upon the quality of final product. To use a comparative case: although deliberately striving for an edgy sound, the indie-rock outfit Palma Violets’ debut release – 180 – was met with both acclaim, and some critique that their music lacked refinement. This record was the output of a year-long project running from band-formation and culminating in album production. Therefore it may be understandable that to some, their music seemed still a little raw.

That particular case, and similar, represent quite a contrast from that of The 1975. Having begun writing music together in their school days, at the time of their debut album’s release The 1975 can boast a history spanning approximately a decade. The duration of this musical project has produced a group of musicians very much in tune with one another, and the band’s debut and self-titled album – The 1975 – conveys togetherness and refinement.

Whilst it does form the band’s debut album, The 1975 is not the band’s debut release. In fact, several EPs have been distributed over the last year, including the FacedownSexMusic for Cars and IV EPs. Furthermore, several of the evident ‘hit’ tracks from the album have already featured in the UK charts: The CityChocolate and Sex; the latter re-released as a single (album-version) just a week prior to the album’s official release date. Thus, the anticipation for the album has built up considerably over the last year, and the band have clearly taken that time to ensure the finished album complies to a standard meeting expectation.

The 1975The band’s alternative, individualistic style flows throughout the record. Admittedly, the band allow themselves a broad artistic licence, and such an approach had produced music transcending various genres. Although it is difficult to succinctly capture their range, a somewhat inadequate summarisation could define them as working within ‘indie-rock’ parameters.

The 1975’s unrestrained meshing of genre-sounds acts to differentiate them amongst peers, however frontman Matthew Healy’s vocal style contributes further uniqueness to the band. His vocals do perhaps require close attention to fully comprehend, yet they comfortably fit the band’s mould, and blend well on record.

In general, the eclectic array of stylistics, combined with Healy’s distinct sound, may not appeal to tastes preferring singular, predictable, easy-going material. But you can’t please everyone. On the other hand (after a few listens of the record), the pluralities within the album are really something to be enjoyed. When considering the band’s history and experience of writing/playing music together, their music can be appreciated on a different level. Certainly the composition is more intelligent than can perhaps be gleaned on first inspection.

At face value, there are easily discernible ‘hit’ songs – the aforementioned single releases are the obvious candidates. Tracks such as Heart Out and Girls also stand out as more catchy tunes that could captivate both part-time and dedicated fans. The achievements of the album will likely be decided by these ‘hits’, and in that case the outlook seems positive. However, the skilled composition, complex interlacing of instrumental layers, and interesting vocals across the record (all commendable features) will hopefully earn it a deeper level of respect that builds its reputation as a success.

Words > Chris Morris
For more info, visit: THE 1975


DAFT PUNK // GET LUCKY
They’re nice robots, they’re gracious’, words spoken directly from Pharrell Williams himself, who features as the lead vocalist on the eagerly anticipated debut single from what is set to be the coolest, hottest, most anticipated, etc, etc, etc ,etc album of 2013, Random Access Memories, by Daft Punk.
Gracious they are indeed, to finally put us out of our misery. Get Lucky was released at midnight last night (EST), and after months of drip feeding snippets of information and a chasm of saturated fakes and remixes, all speculation can finally be put to rest and let the real Daft Punk fill our ears with joy.
Get Lucky, a collaboration with Nile Rodgers and Pharrell, features the ever so cool and recognisable disco guitar inversions of Rodgers, who brings the track to life and lifts dance music out of the stale march which it had positioned itself in, and back into the groove. Pharrell adds a smooth sparkly melody, repeating the chorus line, ‘We’re up all night to get lucky, we’re up all night to get lucky’. Get Lucky is four minutes of genius production, recording, instrumentation and arranging, that may make you question much of your music collection.
For those yearning for the classic Daft Punk sound, it is still here, it’s everywhere. They’ve masterminded a new wave of electronic dance music, again. They’ve even managed to bring their ever so recognisable robotic vocoder to life that repeats, ‘we’re up all night to get lucky, we’re up all night to get lucky’. AND, there’s even a cheeky ‘Discovery’ era’esque synth solo towards the end that feels so real and humane.
Maybe they really are Human After All.
Get Lucky, is out on iTunes NOW.The full album, Random Access Memories, is out May 21st
Words > William Rowe View Larger

DAFT PUNK // GET LUCKY

They’re nice robots, they’re gracious’, words spoken directly from Pharrell Williams himself, who features as the lead vocalist on the eagerly anticipated debut single from what is set to be the coolest, hottest, most anticipated, etc, etc, etc ,etc album of 2013, Random Access Memories, by Daft Punk.

Gracious they are indeed, to finally put us out of our misery. Get Lucky was released at midnight last night (EST), and after months of drip feeding snippets of information and a chasm of saturated fakes and remixes, all speculation can finally be put to rest and let the real Daft Punk fill our ears with joy.

Get Lucky, a collaboration with Nile Rodgers and Pharrell, features the ever so cool and recognisable disco guitar inversions of Rodgers, who brings the track to life and lifts dance music out of the stale march which it had positioned itself in, and back into the groove. Pharrell adds a smooth sparkly melody, repeating the chorus line, ‘We’re up all night to get lucky, we’re up all night to get lucky’. Get Lucky is four minutes of genius production, recording, instrumentation and arranging, that may make you question much of your music collection.

For those yearning for the classic Daft Punk sound, it is still here, it’s everywhere. They’ve masterminded a new wave of electronic dance music, again. They’ve even managed to bring their ever so recognisable robotic vocoder to life that repeats, ‘we’re up all night to get lucky, we’re up all night to get lucky’. AND, there’s even a cheeky ‘Discovery’ era’esque synth solo towards the end that feels so real and humane.

Maybe they really are Human After All.

Get Lucky, is out on iTunes NOW.
The full album, Random Access Memories, is out May 21st

Words > William Rowe


Comedown Machine is up against the odds. As well as having a crap title and an apathetic album sleeve, it has been released without any press or tour dates and is tasked with repairing the damage caused by its disjointed, poorly received predecessor, Angles. Perhaps unsurprisingly then, it is easy to dislike this album. It is galaxies away from the intensity and impact of Is This It, the album which ignited the 2001 New York scene and paved the way for skinny jeans and guitar-led indie bands. But in fairness, that was twelve years and five albums ago.
In truth, Comedown Machine is a bold mishmash of different sounds and genres and makes for an intriguing, if slightly inaccessible, listen. Opening track, Tap Out, begins with a signature screeching guitar but quickly morphs into a catchy, toe-tapping pop tune with a chorus which doesn’t sound dissimilar to Journey’s Don’t Stop Believing. If that wasn’t weird enough, One Way Trigger could almost pass as a rendition of A-Ha’sTake On Me. The 80’s nostalgia characterised by Mario Kart-esque bleeps, synthy guitars and Julian Casablancas’ melodic warbling, is prominent throughout the album. Rather than being a rock comeback, Comedown Machine is more of an 80’s revival.
But just when you think you have the album all figured out, standout track 50 50 appears from the behind the shadow of shoulder pads and bad perms and grabs you unapologetically by the balls. Crunching guitars, furious drums and Casablancas’ throaty, reverb-drenched vocals embody something very familiar. It sounds like The Strokes. Everything that was brilliant about Is This It is encapsulated in this one track. And you can’t help but think it’s a shame that the rest of the album isn’t like this. Perhaps especially in a UK market currently dominated by the likes of Bastille and Mumford and Sons, a bit of searing New York poser punk might have done well to diversify mainstream music, just like it did twelve years ago.
‘What ifs’ aside, however, Comedown Machine is an experimental and interesting album. It is much more accomplished than Angles and the band sound more cohesive than they have done in years. In many ways, comparing it to their 2001 debut is superfluous and negates the natural process of creative evolution which every longstanding, iconic band go through. Although somewhat schizophrenic in its veering from 80’s revival, to indie rock, to smooth jazz (check Call It Fate Call It Karma for a sublime jazz coup), it’s an honest album which offers some reprieve for Strokes fans who have been left nonplussed after years of obscurity and perceived apathy from the band.
Comedown Machine is available now.
Words > Paula Croggon View Larger

Comedown Machine is up against the odds. As well as having a crap title and an apathetic album sleeve, it has been released without any press or tour dates and is tasked with repairing the damage caused by its disjointed, poorly received predecessor, Angles. Perhaps unsurprisingly then, it is easy to dislike this album. It is galaxies away from the intensity and impact of Is This It, the album which ignited the 2001 New York scene and paved the way for skinny jeans and guitar-led indie bands. But in fairness, that was twelve years and five albums ago.

In truth, Comedown Machine is a bold mishmash of different sounds and genres and makes for an intriguing, if slightly inaccessible, listen. Opening track, Tap Out, begins with a signature screeching guitar but quickly morphs into a catchy, toe-tapping pop tune with a chorus which doesn’t sound dissimilar to Journey’s Don’t Stop Believing. If that wasn’t weird enough, One Way Trigger could almost pass as a rendition of A-Ha’sTake On MeThe 80’s nostalgia characterised by Mario Kart-esque bleeps, synthy guitars and Julian Casablancas’ melodic warbling, is prominent throughout the album. Rather than being a rock comeback, Comedown Machine is more of an 80’s revival.

But just when you think you have the album all figured out, standout track 50 50 appears from the behind the shadow of shoulder pads and bad perms and grabs you unapologetically by the balls. Crunching guitars, furious drums and Casablancas’ throaty, reverb-drenched vocals embody something very familiar. It sounds like The Strokes. Everything that was brilliant about Is This It is encapsulated in this one track. And you can’t help but think it’s a shame that the rest of the album isn’t like this. Perhaps especially in a UK market currently dominated by the likes of Bastille and Mumford and Sons, a bit of searing New York poser punk might have done well to diversify mainstream music, just like it did twelve years ago.

‘What ifs’ aside, however, Comedown Machine is an experimental and interesting album. It is much more accomplished than Angles and the band sound more cohesive than they have done in years. In many ways, comparing it to their 2001 debut is superfluous and negates the natural process of creative evolution which every longstanding, iconic band go through. Although somewhat schizophrenic in its veering from 80’s revival, to indie rock, to smooth jazz (check Call It Fate Call It Karma for a sublime jazz coup), it’s an honest album which offers some reprieve for Strokes fans who have been left nonplussed after years of obscurity and perceived apathy from the band.

Comedown Machine is available now.

Words > Paula Croggon